Genuinely a redhead (though it's not my only trait).
Expect plenty of Classics and some archaeology (for those are my things). I watch too much TV and I do go heavy on the feminism because it's bloody important.
I'm also a Brit, this may influence my reblogs etc considerably. Thanks for popping by! :DDD

 

Great British Bake Off things…

Oh, god, my 400th post and it’s about the Bake Off. Like, I expected this one to be about Doctor Who (and there will be one soon, I’m rewatching as I type).

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beaubete:

gingerahoy:

beaubete:

isanah:

reading up on The Bakkhai (or Bacchae), it seems like it’s yet another tragedy.

will Ben be playing Dionysus or Pentheus? curious to know.

I don’t think there’d be the same kind of issues as with Mojo both because of the venue and because of the play itself and possibly the casting as well?  It’s going to be a very small cast, I think (at least for primaries), and the chances of it being quite as star-studded as Mojo are pretty slim.

I think I like the idea of him playing either character, actually.  The Bacchae is actually a really interesting play when interrogated from a feminist perspective—in school, it was one of two plays we studied when we studied feminist theatre (the other was Dry Lips Should Move to Manitoba, which is another really interesting feminist play!)—and it’s misleading to talk about it being a tragedy; The Bacchae is a play in the Tragic style, meaning it’s a story about a man’s struggle against and eventual (inevitable) defeat by the gods.  Yes, it’s sad, but Euripides’s tragedies aren’t often actually about the sad things that happen so much as they are about the depth of humanity’s struggles against the gods’ wills.  

There’s some potential for deeply moving characterization in The Bacchae; Euripides’ Cassandra in The Oresteia is a fascinating character who is just as cursed by the gods as Pentheus, and her scenes in The Oresteia are heartbreaking.  By contrast, Orestes is also touched by the gods for committing matricide, but his story isn’t really sad, just complex and layered.  Both (all four, since The Oresteia is a trilogy) have some really lovely portrayals of homosexuality, too.  Euripides is a surprisingly tender playwright when it comes to human emotion.

Euripides didn’t write the Oresteia, it was Aeschylus - but you’re definitely right that Cassandra’s scene in the Agamemnon is completely and utterly heartbreaking (and also the most frustrating thing in the world, good god). All three of the main Athenian tragic playwrights are damn awesome when it comes to tenderness; the last scene of Oedipus Turranos also basically broke me.  (A millenium and a half later and it’s still doing its job very well!) I can’t think of any mentions of homosexuality, mind you, in either the Bacchai or the Oresteia?

(Re: Whishaw, I’d rather see him as Dionysos, but either is good! I’m up north next year doing a Masters so with any luck he’ll be on when I’m back at home and more able to get to London…)

Ahaha, it shows that my experience is very Oresteia-based and also about ten years old. Oops.

It may have had a lot to do with the staging we did of each. There’s definitely homosexuality in The Oresteia—Orestes’ relationship with Pylades is very classically romantic, and their devotion to each other in the plays is touching—though the homosexuality in The Bacchae may have been more in the interpretation of our director, who had a lot of fun playing with the Bacchae themselves and what their reasons for leaving polite society behind to be Dionysos’s groupies, essentially. It was an interpretation that resonated with me, though—we had a very queer year that year, between three dramatic coming outs and a semester of queer-themed plays (and our campus Christian fellowship, which had a lot more power at our tiny recently-Baptist college than our even tinier 15-person department, ruling that we couldn’t keep a bowl of condoms in our department’s office since it was also used as classroom space). I may be remembering it as a little gayer than it is!

Oh awesome, you staged them! I was in a Greek play last year - we doubled-up Prometheus Bound and the Frogs to try and work with the interface of tragedy and comedy you’d get with the satyr play at the end of a tragic trilogy. I was in the midst of the chorus in both and had a whale of a time, it was an absolute musical extravaganza. As an interpretation of the Bacchai that would work fantastically - especially considering Athenian preoccupations and concerns about any sort of gathering of women leading to uncontrollable drinking, frenzies and sex (it’d be hilarious if it weren’t so sad; I mean, they went out of their way to legislate to control women). I don’t know that the maenads could be said to ‘choose’ to go up onto Kithaeron, mind, I thought the point was that they had gone up under Dionysos’ influence/bewitchment.

I must admit that I’ve not read all of the Oresteia for ages… would that be from the Libation Bearers? If I remember correctly, it’s one of those ‘warrior-friends-ambiguous-lovers’ relationships akin to Achilleos and Patroklos’? I don’t know that I’d say it was a positive portrayal of ‘homosexuality’, mind you, mostly because there wasn’t that notion of differentiation between different sexualities in classical Greek thought, at least, but also because sleeping with another man (i.e. a grown Athenian citizen, not a boy) was essentially overlooked if you weren’t the passive partner - in which case, like poor Cleisthenes in the Frogs, you were a laughing stock. We had to basically chuck out the Greek thought out of the window in our staging, when the notion of sleeping with a man is supposed to be a hilarious joke and/or slightly repulsive, because it would be gross to act in horror!

beaubete:

isanah:

reading up on The Bakkhai (or Bacchae), it seems like it’s yet another tragedy.

will Ben be playing Dionysus or Pentheus? curious to know.

I don’t think there’d be the same kind of issues as with Mojo both because of the venue and because of the play itself and possibly the casting as well?  It’s going to be a very small cast, I think (at least for primaries), and the chances of it being quite as star-studded as Mojo are pretty slim.

I think I like the idea of him playing either character, actually.  The Bacchae is actually a really interesting play when interrogated from a feminist perspective—in school, it was one of two plays we studied when we studied feminist theatre (the other was Dry Lips Should Move to Manitoba, which is another really interesting feminist play!)—and it’s misleading to talk about it being a tragedy; The Bacchae is a play in the Tragic style, meaning it’s a story about a man’s struggle against and eventual (inevitable) defeat by the gods.  Yes, it’s sad, but Euripides’s tragedies aren’t often actually about the sad things that happen so much as they are about the depth of humanity’s struggles against the gods’ wills.  

There’s some potential for deeply moving characterization in The Bacchae; Euripides’ Cassandra in The Oresteia is a fascinating character who is just as cursed by the gods as Pentheus, and her scenes in The Oresteia are heartbreaking.  By contrast, Orestes is also touched by the gods for committing matricide, but his story isn’t really sad, just complex and layered.  Both (all four, since The Oresteia is a trilogy) have some really lovely portrayals of homosexuality, too.  Euripides is a surprisingly tender playwright when it comes to human emotion.

Euripides didn’t write the Oresteia, it was Aeschylus - but you’re definitely right that Cassandra’s scene in the Agamemnon is completely and utterly heartbreaking (and also the most frustrating thing in the world, good god). All three of the main Athenian tragic playwrights are damn awesome when it comes to tenderness; the last scene of Oedipus Turranos also basically broke me.  (A millenium and a half later and it’s still doing its job very well!) I can’t think of any mentions of homosexuality, mind you, in either the Bacchai or the Oresteia?

(Re: Whishaw, I’d rather see him as Dionysos, but either is good! I’m up north next year doing a Masters so with any luck he’ll be on when I’m back at home and more able to get to London…)

pieandhotdogs:

elderleaves:

spamanos:

zeus took fuck, marry, kill way too seriously

"IT’S ‘FUCK, MARRY, OR KILL!’ ‘OR!’ NOT AND!’ WHAT THE FUCK IS WRONG WITH YOU!?”

— Hades at some point probably

I laughed way too hard at this.

(Source: questfortheholymale)

Brazil: i came out tonight to have a good time and i'm honestly feeling so attacked right now

‘Bond 24′ is Being Rewritten; ‘Polite Turmoil’ Behind the Scenes

incestuousgeckobrothers:

thehappysorceress:

ceebee-eebee - oh, no!

NOPENOPENOPENOPENOPE!

The source for this is the Daily Mail. I wouldn’t trust anything out of that rag, it’s a dreadful paper which sensationalises anything it possibly can for site hits and links.

Excuse me, I need to have a panic at something re: the thesis viva I had yesterday and that something happens to be my tumblr. Don’t mind me.

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Went to the zoo today! A post-exam treat. They had meerkats and otters and bunnies to stroke and so many different types of monkey, omg.
In other news, I have limited talent as a wildlife photographer.

Went to the zoo today! A post-exam treat. They had meerkats and otters and bunnies to stroke and so many different types of monkey, omg.

In other news, I have limited talent as a wildlife photographer.

Right, so! Exam went fine. I think one third of it went off in a pants direction (how can one forget so easily about all the choral odes in Ajax?) but the essay questions  were a gift. I feel I acquitted myself well enough, and that’ll do.

Also, I had the best nap this afternoon, it was so nice!

Tonight, Criminal Minds, martini and a bit of a break before the next salvo… :D

Tomorrow at noon I will be two thirds of the way through my finals!This next exam (it’s on Sophocles as a tragedian and mythmaker…) is likely going to be… interesting. It could go one way or the other, is what I’m saying.  Basically, I’m imagining whoever set this exam:

But it will be fine. Because I can handle this, I totally can. And it’ll be fine and then I’ve got a long weekend until the next one! :D

(But, ῶ Ζευ, if you could hand over a lovely juicy question about the divine I would be most obliged… :D?)